U.S. Supreme Court Weighs in on Mortgage "Strip-Offs"

Yesterday the United States Supreme Court ruled that a Chapter 7 debtor may not avoid - aka "strip off" - a second mortgage even though the amount owed on the first mortgage exceeds the value of the home that secures the loans. This ruling is consistent with the law applied in bankruptcy courts in Virginia for many years. The decision originated from two bankruptcy cases in Florida in which Chapter 7 debtors were allowed to strip off their second mortgages.

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Why Businesses May Like the "Duke Rules Package" Part 4 of 4: The Outcome

Earlier this year, I introduced a four-part series about the "Duke Rules Package" which includes drastic changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. On April 29, 2015, Chief Justice John Roberts officially informed Congress that the high Court had adopted most of the rules proposed by the Duke Rules Package, taking effect December 1, 2015. In this final installment, I summarize the rules ultimately adopted by the Supreme Court.

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Good News for Subcontractors and Suppliers: Prospective Lien and Bond Claim Waivers are Null and Void

Until now, Virginia has been among a number of states that allow a subcontractor or supplier of materials to a construction project to waive its rights to a mechanic's lien or a payment bond claim prospectively, before even beginning work, by agreeing to such a waiver in a subcontract, purchase order or even a progress payment lien waiver. With the passage of Senate Bill 891,Virginia joins the ranks of a majority of states that prohibit such waivers.

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The Emerging Law on the Commercial Use of Drones

The body of law relating to drones, those small, unmanned, remote controlled aircraft - those flying gizmos - is in its infancy, but is growing rapidly. In February of this year, the Federal Aviation Administration announced a new set of rules which authorize the commercial use of drones, albeit in a very limited manner.

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